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Showing posts from tagged with: food

Here’s what you should know about Freeze Drying

Posted by admin in Food, Givingtreesnacks, Health, Uncategorized | 0 comments

  In case you haven’t noticed it yet; our Giving Tree fruit crisps are really special as they are freeze dried. Sounds pretty fancy, doesn’t it? And as most of you might ask yourselves what vacuum drying exactly is, we would like to explain this method to you a little but further today and make also clear why we chose to dry our fruits this way. By freeze drying fruits, these are dehydrated at a low temperature, which freezes the water inside and makes it as a result evaporate into gas. Thereby around 80 to 90 % of water are removed from of the fruit. To give you a more precisely idea of the immense evaporation process, listen up: after drying 7 to 10kg of fruits, there is only 1kg left. That’s when you actually notice how much water fruits contain!     While they contain up to 87% of water, vegetables can be even composed of 95%! So if you know that you are definitely not drinking enough water, you should at least try to eat more fruits and vegetables to get your body hydrated. Anyway, not only the water is an important benefit of fresh food, but also the high number of nutrients, especially vitamins! And while most of the dried fruits unfortunately lose many nutrients and are instead prepared with lots of sugar once they are dried, our Giving Tree fruit snacks still got all the nutrients and NO added sugar! Remember also that you should eat at least 5 fruits and vegetables a day, while the Giving Tree crisps are covering indeed one of these 5. So don’t hesitate to integrate a little pack of our Giving Tree Peach, Strawberry or Mango crisps in your daily diet and your body will be more than well provided.  

Summer Comfort Eating Essentials

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22.07.16

Summer Comfort Food We all have moments where a home comfort meal makes us feel the world of good. Generally speaking, comforting food comes in the form of something which doesn’t always make you feel that great after consumption though, however with a few changes we can still enjoy these same comforts but with a healthy twist, and subsequently enjoy them guilt free.

CHIPS!

There are different kinds of chip eaters - whether you’re a sharer, an occasional enjoyer, a wrap them up and take them home to enjoy on your own kind of person, or someone who simply can’t get enough of them, a portion of the nation’s favourite shaped potato doesn’t ever go amiss. However, they aren’t always the healthiest option; the humble sweet potato though makes for an entirely different story. One of our absolute favourite home comfort alternatives comes in the form of sweet potato fries, and is a great way also of getting a wonderful amount of beta-carotene, fibre and hair, nail and skin nourishing goodness into your system without any compromise on comfort! Simply slice them, add a small drizzle of olive oil, herbs, and whichever flavourings take your fancy, and pop them in the oven - it really couldn’t be easier!

SPAG BOL

The perfect carby comfort food, try spirallazing your favourite vegetable, we like butternut squash, courgette or carrot and gently cook these in a drizzle of oil until softened. Serve with your favourite veggie packed Bolognese and a generous helping of reduced fat cheese, or a lighter cheese such as feta. Another great option is buckwheat or brown rice pasta, as they are completely gluten free as well as healthful and honestly taste just as good. Try mashing together an avocado, basil, lemon and pine nuts for a healthy creamy alternative too!

PANCAKES

Making for the perfect Sunday brunch option (or just whichever meal takes your fancy), it’s undeniable that these are some of our favourite go-to’s for an indulgent, home comfort-style meal. However, with the general ingredients for our favourite round indulgence being not extremely healthy, and therefore not something we generally indulge in on a daily basis, its important to recognise the ingredients which will make up for this so that we can do just that! Ingredients which are great for this include oats, banana, almond milk, medjool dates and more - all completely natural and make for a delicious, energy abundant treat whenever takes your fancy.

COOKIES

Try a cashew coconut cookies for a wonderfully crunchy snack with a slight Christmassy feel to them with the ginger and cinnamon element to them. As well as this, chocolate-banana oat cookies are a great alternative to our choccy childhood faves, with cacao powder and date syrup creating the flavours we all love and once again, oats and bananas the consistency. They really are great, and you can be rest assured once you smell them exiting the oven, it will be as though you have been transformed back to your childhood home treats once again. So enjoy your tasty summer comfort foods, on us!

Tips for more mindful eating

Posted by admin in Food, Givingtreesnacks, Health, Mindful, Uncategorized | 0 comments

14.06.16

We could all do with a refresher course on how to eat to benefit our health. Mindful eating may be the answer. You may have heard of mindfulness or mindfulness training. What is Mindfulness? Mindfulness can be defined as a mental state that focuses on the present as well as an awareness and acceptance of one's innermost emotions, thoughts and feelings. Similarly mindful eating is eating with intention and attention. Our culture of overconsumption today suffers a binary where diseases such as obesity and diabetes are rife, whilst other eating disorders such as anorexia and bulimia nervousa are hidden. On every corner we see fast food chains selling artery clogging 'happy meals' and every editorial is obsessed with the latest fad diet or detox cleanse. It is very easy to become confused with our relationship with food. Mindfulness is used as a form of cognitive behavioural therapy and has been successful as a form of treatment for individuals with disordered eating habits and obese individuals. <indful eat Here are some tips for more mindful eating. Respect your hunger cues.  This may seem obvious to some however others find that they often eat out of other reasons, such as boredom, sadness or as an emotional filler for real life problems. This is where mindful eating comes in. With a deeper awareness of our surroundings and inner emotions comes a  better ability to address problems at hand a more effective strategy than say 'eating our feelings'. Eating is often used as a coping mechanism for life's hardships, this can lead to a disordered relationship with food and in serious cases even obesity. On the other hand, we should not ignore hunger pangs as they come throughout the day. Waiting till you are ravenous can leave you desperate for food and susceptible to making poor food choices and can ultimately mess with your plan to eat more healthfully. Put simply it is best to eat when you are hungry and stop when you are full. This can help make eating a more enjoyable and rewarding experience void of the feelings of guilt and discomfort that are associated with overeating and junk food. Mindful eating tomatoes   Mindful eating can sometimes mean eating more slowly. This way our body has more time to register how much food we are eating before we are too full. Additionally, studies have shown those who spend more time chewing their food achieve a greater level of satiety after their meal. When we slow down we can really focus on what we are doing and what we are eating, this way we may be better able to enjoy every bite of our food, feel full and avoid overeating. In the recent decades the whole culture of food and eating has changed completely, the landscape of the food industry is now run rampant by fast food chains and in some countries even drive throughs. When we take time to carefully prepare our food, and sit down for a meal we may feel more in tune with our hunger and fullness cues. Taking a tip from the practice of mindfulness we may better able to appreciate our food and savour each bite. Pose Mindful eating Eat food that is both optimal for both your enjoyment and health. When you really pay attention to what you are eating you may be better able to focus on food that is enjoyable, balanced, healthy and will leave you satisfied after you finish your meal. Often when we eat processed prepackaged food we may eat what seems to be a lot of food and still be left wanting more, this may be because our body does not feel as though it is getting the nutrients it deserves. However when we eat an abundance of well-balanced, nutrient rich foods our body can feel full and satisfied and less prone to sudden hunger pangs and mood swings. In the long run this can save us from bouts of overeating, binging on unhealthy foods and ultimately leave us free to fuel our body with the energy we need to live life to the fullest. Overall, it is important to take a lesson from mindfulness to make us more appreciative for every moment we are given. When we are swarmed with an army of fast food options at every corner it is important to stop and think where our food comes from before we eat it. Mindful eating helps us eat more intuitively, feel greater satisfaction and avoid feelings of regret after our meal. When we revolutionise the way we eat, eating instead to nourish our body and mind, we may develop a greater appreciation for our food and be better prepared to tackle the modern day obesity epidemic. For more tips of mindful eating click here or here.

National Vegetarian Week – the best of the bites!

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17.05.16

National Vegetarian Week is upon us, so why not try one of these delicious meat-free meals?

These dishes are full of flavour, texture and colour so you won't feel like you're missing out on anything at all.

For the Pasta and Cheese lovers..

Mac and three cheeses recipe

SERVES 4

INGREDIENTS 1 x 410g tin of evaporated milk 200g cream cheese 2 tsp English mustard ¼ tsp freshly grated nutmeg 350g macaroni 3 tbsp chi coconut oil 1 small garlic clove, crushed 175g  Comté or cheddar, grated 75g stilton, crumbled 500g green beans 1 tbsp chopped chives 45g  sourdough breadcrumbs 45g  pecans 150g sun-dried tomatoes in olive oil

METHOD Preheat the oven to 180°C/350°F/gas mark 4.
Whisk the evaporated milk, cream cheese and mustard well. Add the nutmeg and plenty of freshly ground black pepper.
Bring 3.5 litres of salted water to a boil, and add the macaroni, slowly, making sure the water is always boiling. Stir for a minute to stop the macaroni sticking together. Test after about eight minutes – the macaroni should be very al dente. Drain well and add to the cream-cheese mixture.
 Mix a tablespoon of coconut oil and garlic and use this to grease a deep 20 x 20cm (8 x8 in) baking-dish. Spread half of the macaroni on the bottom of the dish. Scatter on half of the Comté and all of the stilton, cover with another layer of macaroni and finish with the rest of the Comté. Bake for 25 to 30 minutes, or until bubbly and golden.
Boil or steam the green beans until tender with a slight crunch – about five minutes. Drain, place in a bowl and sprinkle with the chives. Heat the coconut oil in a frying-pan. When hot, add the breadcrumbs and pecans and cook for two to three minutes, until crisp and golden. Add the beans and toss to coat them well. Serve the macaroni with green beans and, if you wish, a few tomatoes on the side.   cheesemac

Mushroom, spinach, and blue-cheese lasagne

This creamy vegetarian lasagne full of chesnut mushrooms is perfect served with a big salad and some fresh crusty bread

SERVES 4
INGREDIENTS 3 tbsp olive oil 2 x 250g packs chestnut mushrooms, cleaned and sliced 1 large onion, finely chopped 1 large clove of garlic, crushed 2 x 240g packs pre-washed fresh spinach 1 large jar ready-made white sauce (710g) 12 sheets ready-to-bake lasagne 125g blue cheese, crumbled
METHOD Preheat the oven to 200C/gas mark 6. Heat one tablespoon of olive oil in a large pan, add half the mushrooms and fry until golden, about five minutes. Transfer them to kitchen paper, add another tablespoon of oil to the pan and fry the remaining mushrooms, also transferring them to kitchen paper after five minutes.
Add the final tablespoon of olive oil to the pan and cook the onion and garlic for about four minutes, until soft. Add the spinach to the pan, cover with a lid and allow it to wilt for one to two minutes. Return the mushrooms to the pan, mix together and season.
Use a rectangular dish about 24 x 18cm and spread a layer of white sauce on the base. Place three lasagne sheets on the sauce followed by a third of the mushroom mixture, another layer of white sauce and some crumbled cheese.
Add another three sheets of lasagne and continue layering, finishing with the final three sheets of lasagne, a good covering of white sauce and a sprinkling of crumbled cheese. Bake for 35 to 40 minutes until it is cooked through and the topping is bubbling and golden. Serve with a side salad or garlic bread.

Aubergine, pepper and yogurt stacks with coriander pesto

Serves four
3 red peppers chi coconut oil for brushing 2 large aubergines ½ lemon 8 heaped tbsp Greek yogurt sprigs of coriander to serve
For the pesto: 60g (2oz) coriander leaves 40g (1½oz) blanched almonds, lightly toasted 2 garlic cloves, chopped juice of ½ lemon 125ml (4fl oz) extra-virgin olive oil (not too grassy) 60g (2oz) feta cheese, finely crumbled 1 red chilli, halved, deseeded and finely chopped 1 green chilli, halved, deseeded and finely chopped
Preheat the oven to 190°C/375°F/gas mark 5. Halve the peppers and remove the seeds and stalk. Put into a small roasting-tin and brush with olive oil. Season. Roast for 35 minutes, or until the peppers are tender and the edges of the flesh are slightly scorched.
Meanwhile make the pesto by putting everything, except the feta and chilli, into a food processor. Whizz to a purée. Season to taste, then scrape into a bowl and add the feta cheese and chilli.   stacks_2917851b
Bean chilli with chocolate and walnuts
SERVES 6-8
INGREDIENTS 2 tbsp chi coconut oil 1 large onion, finely chopped 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped 2 tsp cumin seeds or 1 tsp ground cumin 1 fresh chilli, deseeded and finely chopped (more if you like it hot) 1 tsp ground paprika 1 tsp dried oregano 1 red and 1 yellow pepper, seeded and finely chopped 1 carrot, finely chopped 2 sweetcorn cobs (kernels cut off) or 150g thawed frozen sweetcorn 2 large celery sticks (use leaves too), finely sliced 150g  walnuts, very finely chopped 300g dried mixed beans, such as kidney, black-eye or borlotti, soaked and cooked (or 3 x 400g cans cooked mixed pulses, drained) 2 x 400g cans whole plum tomatoes 2 tsp sea salt 60g dark chocolate (minimum 80 per cent cocoa solids), broken into pieces
to serve 120ml  plain yogurt 1 large handful coriander leaves, coarsely chopped Giving Tree broccoli and pumpkin crisps to dip and use as toppings too
METHOD Heat the oil in a large heavy-based saucepan or casserole over a medium heat. Add the onion, garlic, spices and oregano and cook for a couple of minutes, stirring occasionally, until the spices smell fragrant and the onions are soft but not browned.
Add the peppers, carrot, sweetcorn and celery and cook for another couple of minutes. Add the walnuts, beans, tomatoes, 250ml (9fl oz) water and salt, bring to the boil, then reduce the heat and simmer for 20 minutes. Stir in the chocolate and cook for a couple of minutes. Taste and season. Serve in bowls, garnished with a dollop of yogurt and chopped coriander with toasted corn tortillas on the side. Any leftovers can be stored in the fridge for three to five days.

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Why are there days when you just can’t stop eating? Banish the hunger!

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16.05.16

This great article for the Daily Mail features advice from our nutritionist Rhiannon Lambert on why you get those dreaded hunger pangs!

You know the feeling - you wake up with hunger pangs that even a hearty breakfast and slap-up lunch do little to diminish. But what causes those 'hyper-hungry' days when all you can think about is the next snack? We look at the science behind the stomach rumbles.

YOU'RE NOT GETTING ENOUGH SLEEP

If you didn't sleep well last night, chances are you won't only feel exhausted. You will feel ravenous, too.

Those who don't go to bed until the early hours end up eating an extra 248 calories the next day, according to a study in the journal Obesity.

Those who don't go to bed until the early hours end up eating an extra 248 calories the next day

Those who don't go to bed until the early hours end up eating an extra 248 calories the next day

Being exhausted has also been found to encourage us to eat twice the amount of high-calorie fast food and fizzy drinks - and half the amount of fruit and veg.

If you keep skimping on sleep, scientists say you are likely to become badly overweight, because the stress on your body interrupts the balance of 'hunger hormones' ghrelin and leptin, which tell you if you are hungry or full.

As a result, people who regularly get only five hours of sleep have been found to be 50 per cent more likely to be obese than those getting eight hours.

Nutritionist Rhiannon Lambert, of rhitrition.com, says: 'If you are tired and your body hasn't had enough sleep the night before to stoke energy levels, it is going to crave glucose - sugar, carbs and fizzy drinks - like crazy because it needs more energy quickly.'

EATING TOO MANY CARBS AT DINNERTIME

If you felt famished when you woke up this morning, cast your mind back to what you had for dinner last night. If it was pizza, garlic bread and cake, you went to sleep on a major sugar high.

Refined carbohydrates such as these are made of small molecules which are quickly digested and converted into glucose - a sugar produced by the liver that fuels the brain. Eating them causes levels of these sugars not only to rise rapidly but to drop fast, too.

The resulting low means on waking up, your brain immediately craves glucose. Hunger hormones are then released, making you want to eat as soon as possible.

To avoid starting the day hungry, experts advise dinners that combine more complex carbs - brown rice, whole grain breads and pastas, which are processed more slowly by the body - with proteins, such as meat, fish or nuts, which are also more difficult to digest.

Endocrinologist Sir Stephen O'Rahilly, a professor at Cambridge University, says carbs don't switch off hunger hormones as well as other foods.

'Inside your intestines are tiny sensor cells which detect how much protein and carbs you have eaten.

'Protein stimulates these cells more strongly than carbs, which is why it's harder to eat too much steak than too much pizza. You need to include protein in meals to tell your brain you have had enough.'

A BIG NIGHT OUT WITH FRIENDS

Drinking doesn't just land you with a raging hangover the next morning. It can also give you the munchies.

Research published in the journal Alcohol And Alcoholism found just three glasses of wine can lower levels of hormone leptin, which keeps hunger at bay, by up to 30 per cent.

Also, your liver will have spent so much time breaking down the alcohol in your blood overnight it won't have been able to deliver the levels of glucose your brain needs to function.

Professor O'Rahilly, says: 'If you poison your liver with alcohol, it does not make the normal amount that your brain is used to. So when you wake up, it screams emergency because it wants glucose so badly.'

MOUTHWATERING FOOD ADS

Tempting food smells set off cravings, too. Our brains light up when we smell our favourite foods - in the same way that those of cocaine addicts do when they think about their next drug fix

With food adverts tempting us everywhere we go, no wonder eating is always on our minds.

Just looking at pictures of appetising meals can make you hungry, according to researchers at Germany's Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry.

They found we produce more nof the hunger hormone ghrelin when we see the images.

Tempting food smells set off cravings, too. New York-based Brookhaven National Laboratory found our brains light up when we smell our favourite foods - in the same way that those of cocaine addicts do when they think about their next drug fix.

The result of all this is that we no longer just eat when we are hungry, says Alison Clark, of the British Dietetic Association. 'Triggers like food ads can actually make people want to eat - even when they don't need to.'

NOT DRINKING ENOUGH WATER

You think you're peckish - but if you don't take on enough fluids, you may be misinterpreting your thirst as hunger. When we are dehydrated, these messages become confused in the hypothalamus, the part of the brain which regulates appetite hormones, so we reach for a snack when we actually need a drink.

Nutritionist Rhiannon Lambert says: 'Our body is 60 per cent water and all our cells need it. If you're dehydrated, you're going to start getting moody, tired, losing concentration. However, that feeling can get confused in the brain with hunger as it has the same effects.

If you don't drink enough, you may be misinterpreting your thirst as hunge

If you don't drink enough, you may be misinterpreting your thirst as hunge

'People should therefore aim for about two litres a day minimum, even when you don't actually feel thirsty, to avoid this confusion.'

SUFFERING THE 'BUFFET EFFECT'

The trend for importing cuisines from all over the world means we have never enjoyed a wider range of exotic flavours.

But eating lots of different types of food at one meal - known as the 'buffet effect' - can trick us into eating more than we need.

A study in the Journal Of Consumer Research found diners tend to eat 10 per cent more if offered a variety of foods.

When faced with a large choice at one meal, researchers think our eyes con us into underestimating the quantities of each dish. Over a year, this 'optical illusion' can lead to weight gain of up to 20 lb.

Therapist Marisa Peer, author of You Can Be Younger, says studies show how a new taste can also reset our appetite - even when full. 'There is only so much of one food we can have before we get bored and stop eating. When you are given a taste, even if feeling full, it stimulates your appetite again.

'This is why you still have room for dessert after a filling Sunday lunch.'

WOLFING DOWN YOUR MEAL

When you rush a meal, you may fill your stomach quickly. But your brain needs time to register you've had enough.

Experts say it starts to realise you are full only when your meal begins to be digested.

'It takes about 20 minutes for your body to register and for your receptors in your stomach to reach the brain and say: “Thanks very much. I'm full. Stop eating,”' says Alison Clark of the British Dietetic Association.

'So we suggest taking time to pause after a meal instead of going on to the next course in order to allow the chemical signals to reach the brain.'

YOUR PERIOD IS ON THE WAY

If your period is on the way, the biscuit tin will be much harder to resist.

During the second half of your menstrual cycle, levels of the sex hormone progesterone rise as your body gets ready for pregnancy by sending blood to the womb.

As part of this preparation, it also triggers hunger hormones to persuade you to eat more and give your body the reserves to grow a baby.

As your period approaches, levels of the female sex hormone oestrogen also dramatically drop off - and with it levels of the feelgood hormone serotonin.

Lucia Lukanova, founder of The Flow app, which helps women chart their cycles, says: 'Women's food cravings start in the last week before their period when their progesterone and oestrogen levels fall.

'This sudden withdrawal is like taking cigarettes away from a smoker so we crave alternatives, like comfort foods, to make us feel better.'

It’s all about the Yoghurt recipes!

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10.05.16

We are absolutely loving mixing up our breakfasts at the moment with lighter recipes now Winter is over it can be so lovely to have a breakfast that does't need to give you that warm feeling like porridge but instead yoghurt makes a great option too, and so versatile. If you are Dairy Free these are perfect for you and remember the non-dairy free yoghurt recipes, you can always substitute for the dairy free versions! 1. This recipe is DELICIOUS and especially good if you like fruit flavours. We used Blueberry yoghurt from The Coconut Collaborative, Giving Tree Strawberry Crisps and fresh banana sliced up. A sprinkling of chia seeds is also delicious and granola for an extra crunch. Coconut Collaborative is totally dairy free, gluten and soya free too!Screenshot 2016-05-10 12.28.25 2. Co Yo is so thick and creamy it feels like your being far too naughty to have this for breakfast, however with only coconut milk and dairy free again as well as no added sugars this is one of our favourites! We mixed the natural and raw chocolate yoghurts together to create a delicious breakfast with a drizzle of Pip & Nut Peanut Butter and our Giving Tree strawberry crips plus chia seeds!Screenshot 2016-05-10 12.30.22 3. Yorica - This creation is from the fantastic totally free from every allergen Ice-cream/Fro Yo store in Soho! This was violet and matcha green tea plus our Giving Tree crisps for toppings. We couldn't believe this was allergen free and so delicious!Screenshot 2016-05-10 12.30.32 4. A very simple yet super delicious recipe, simply use your favourite natural yoghurt add granola and crushed Giving Tree strawberry crisps or your favourite flavour! Screenshot 2016-05-10 12.30.42

Healthy gadgets for on the go snacking!

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21.04.16

Let’s be honest: most of the time, being healthy is not convenient. If you fancy a quick snack at work or need to grab breakfast on the go, you often have to settle for whatever’s on offer at your local shop and usually, it’s not exactly what you want.

The best way to avoid this situation is simple – BE PREPARED. But how? Healthy gadgets are here to help..

Fortunately, there are a number of wonderful items available to help make the whole process easier. Here are five things that will help you to become healthier on a day-to-day basis. They’re all affordable too – hooray!

1. Blender Bottle GoStak – starting from £9.00 So simple, and yet so clever. You can stock up on bags of nuts, seeds, dried fruit etc., and fill each of the little interlocking jars so that you have snacks for the day ahead. This way you have tasty treats to hand at all times, and you're also able to make sure you don’t overindulge. Take a look at our lovely strawberry Giving Tree snacks which perfectly into the handy GoStak!

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2. Water Infuser Bottle – starting from £6.99 If you find drinking or even enjoying water a struggle, why not try infusing it with good stuff? Lemon, strawberry, cucumber – whatever you want! It all tastes amazing in water-y form. Just chop up your chosen fruit or veg, pop it into the little cage, fill the bottle with water and leave it in the fridge overnight. In the morning, drink up and delight in your delicious refreshment.

3. Vacu Vin Banana Guard – £2.49 If you love bananas this is for you, especially when you don't want them bruising . This handy guard allows you to transport your banana in safety, free of any nasty black marks. There are a few varieties of guard available, but we like this as it accommodates any shape banana!

bananna

4. A blender with a portable cup – starting from £19.99 When you're in rush in the mornings,  a good smoothie or shake for breakfast is perfect as it’s a quick way to get fruit inside your body. Now it’s even easier thanks to blenders that come with portable travel bottles or cups! Delicious and simple!

6. Food hugger and  avocado saver container - for when you have that half of an avocado ALWAYS left and it goes brown the next day, this is the perfect avocado saver! Say goodbye to brown fruit and veg

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Don’t forget food groups that ARE healthy!

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19.04.16

Nutritional guidelines and recommendations are constantly changing with new research. It can be difficult to keep up with which foods are healthy and which aren’t, there is also confusion with inaccurate sources telling us different things all the time!

Take a look at these foods that have gone through the cycle of being the 'baddies' of nutritional science, but are now okay to eat again.

Remember, everything in moderation, and cooking methods play a large factor in healthy eating too!

EGGS

For a long time, eggs were thought to be bad for your heart. A large egg contains 185mg of cholesterol. Dietary cholesterol was believed to contribute to high blood cholesterol levels. But for the last 20 years, nutrition and medical research has shown repeatedly that at normal intakes dietary cholesterol has very little influence on a person’s cholesterol levels.

Although it’s taken time, nutrition experts are now correcting the record for eggs by removing it as a nutrient of concern from dietary guidelines. Eggs are an excellent source of protein, healthy fats, and several vitamins and minerals.

It can often be the way you cook an egg that contributes to it being unhealthy. Frying an egg in lashings of butter, and making scrambled eggs with too much butter and full fat milk will increase your daily fat intake drastically.

Try poaching your eggs for a delicious breakfast.

speltoatsavouryporridge2-1

POTATOES

Potatoes are one of the few vegetables that are actually considered to be unhealthy. They have a high glycaemic index so often get put with foods made from refined carbohydrates as foods to avoid. But potatoes are a rich source of carbohydrates, vitamin C, some B vitamins and minerals.

How you prepare potatoes completely changes the aspects of those starches that get a bad name. Cooking and cooling potatoes increases the amount of resistant starch in the potatoes. This resistant starch then acts like dietary fibre which “resists” digestion in the gut, potentially having a positive impact on your gut bacteria.

DAIRY

Milk, butter, yogurt and cheese were once considered a staple in many people’s diet, but this seems to have changed which could be down to mixed health messages.

Positive aspects of dairy include the high protein and calcium content. Fat content and fat type are important when choosing dairy products as some contain high amounts of fat per serving and this fat tends to be high in saturated fat.

Although it’s best to avoid a diet high in saturated fat (a risk factor for CHD), regularly consuming dairy products doesn’t need to be a concern if your overall calorie intake and fat intake is healthy.

It can often be worse to consume dairy products such as cheeses and yogurts that are reduced fat or 'healthier', as added sugar, artificial flavourings and additives are often used to replace the fat content.

The recent updates to the UK Eat Well Plate still promotes dairy foods as part of a healthy diet, as long as the dairy choices are lower in fat.

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NUTS

Nuts also get a bad reputation for being high in fat and high in calories, leading some to suggest they should be avoided by anyone looking to lose weight. A recent study, published in the British Journal of Nutrition, showed that eating raw nuts reduces death from all causes, cardiovascular diseases, coronary heart disease and sudden cardiac death.

Raw nuts contain protein, healthy fats (low saturated fat and high monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fat), dietary fibre and micronutrients.

Nut butters, such as peanut butter, can also be part of a healthy diet. The fat in peanut butter has a healthy profile and peanut butter is also an excellent source of protein, fibre, vitamin B6 and magnesium. Some recent evidence has shown increased weight loss for people that replace less healthy proteins, such as processed meats, with peanut butter.

You should aim to avoid nut butters with added sugar, salt and palm oil though.

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Eat your Broccoli!

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10.11.15

We are going to be like your mother 'EAT YOUR BROCCOLI!'  We are sorry but your Mum is right ;) Broccoli is full of potassium and folate which helps prevent anemia and it also gives you solid doses of vitamin A. Our crispy broccoli will help you to eat more broccoli. How many people that we met told us they hate broccoli and after trying crispy Broccoli they become a Broccoli Lover!  Not convinced? See below all the benefits that you can get from broccoli. Screen Shot 2015-11-10 at 12.37.07 8 Health Benefits: 1. Cancer Prevention Broccoli contains glucoraphanin, which the body processes into the anti-cancer compound sulforaphane. This compound rids the body of H. pylori, a bacterium found to highly increase the risk of gastric cancer. Furthermore, broccoli contains indole-3-carbinol, a powerful antioxidant compound and anti-carcinogen found to not only hinder the growth of breast, cervical and prostate cancer, but also boosts liver function. 2. Cholesterol Reduction Like many whole foods, broccoli is packed with soluble fibre that draws cholesterol out of your body. 3. Reducing Allergy Reaction and Inflammation Broccoli is a particularly rich source of kaempferol and isothiocyanates, both anti-inflammatory phyto nutrients. Research has shown the ability of kaempferol to lessen the impact of allergy-related substances on our body. This vegetable even has significant amounts of omega 3 fatty acids, which are well know as an anti-inflammatory. 4. Powerful Antioxidant Of all the cruciferous vegetables, broccoli stands out as the most concentrated source of vitamin C. Also concentrated in broccoli are the carotenoids lutein, zeaxanthin and beta-carotene, other powerful antioxidants. 5. Bone Health This green vegetable contains high levels of both calcium and vitamin K, both of which are important for bone health and prevention of osteoporosis. 6. Heart Health The anti-inflammatory properties of sulforaphane, one of the isothiocyanates  in broccoli, may be able to prevent  some of the damage to blood vessel linings that can be caused by inflammation due to chronic blood sugar problems. 7. Detoxification Glucoraphanin, gluconasturtiin and glucobrassicin are special phytonutrients that support all steps in the body’s detox process, including activation, neutralization and elimination of unwanted contaminants. These three are in the perfect combination in broccoli. 8. Diet Aid Broccoli is a smart carb and is high in fibre, which aids in digestion, prevents constipation, maintains low blood sugar, and curbs overeating. Furthermore, a cup of broccoli has as much protein as a cup of rice or corn with half the calories.      

Why should we eat raw?

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02.10.15

Everybody wants to eat raw, but why is there such excitement about raw food? Heating food which is heating to high temperatures destroys its nutrients and natural enzymes, which is bad because enzymes boost digestion, and fight chronic disease. In short when you cook it, you kill it! Raw fruit, fish, vegetables, nuts and seeds are all brimming with vitamins and minerals which can help boost our immune system, give our gums a great workout, keep us slim and leave our skin looking young and silky. So let's eat Raw! Screen Shot 2015-10-02 at 14.53.18 See below all the health benefits from raw food:

  • You will have more energy
  • Your skin will have a much better appearance
  • Your digestion will improve
  • You will lose weight
  • Your risk of developing heart and cardiovascular diseases will significantly drop
    Screen Shot 2015-10-02 at 15.02.09   However, a diet made up of raw food and nothing else is unhealthy because we are not getting all the protein and carbohydrates found in other groups of food such as meat and grains.   An ideal diet is composed with your daily quota of five portions of fruit & vegetables and the right amount of protein & fats.

Our Giving Tree fruits are 100% raw and perfect to help you to maintain a healthy diet.

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