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Showing posts from tagged with: healthy eating

Here’s what you should know about Freeze Drying

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  In case you haven’t noticed it yet; our Giving Tree fruit crisps are really special as they are freeze dried. Sounds pretty fancy, doesn’t it? And as most of you might ask yourselves what vacuum drying exactly is, we would like to explain this method to you a little but further today and make also clear why we chose to dry our fruits this way. By freeze drying fruits, these are dehydrated at a low temperature, which freezes the water inside and makes it as a result evaporate into gas. Thereby around 80 to 90 % of water are removed from of the fruit. To give you a more precisely idea of the immense evaporation process, listen up: after drying 7 to 10kg of fruits, there is only 1kg left. That’s when you actually notice how much water fruits contain!     While they contain up to 87% of water, vegetables can be even composed of 95%! So if you know that you are definitely not drinking enough water, you should at least try to eat more fruits and vegetables to get your body hydrated. Anyway, not only the water is an important benefit of fresh food, but also the high number of nutrients, especially vitamins! And while most of the dried fruits unfortunately lose many nutrients and are instead prepared with lots of sugar once they are dried, our Giving Tree fruit snacks still got all the nutrients and NO added sugar! Remember also that you should eat at least 5 fruits and vegetables a day, while the Giving Tree crisps are covering indeed one of these 5. So don’t hesitate to integrate a little pack of our Giving Tree Peach, Strawberry or Mango crisps in your daily diet and your body will be more than well provided.  

Summer Comfort Eating Essentials

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22.07.16

Summer Comfort Food We all have moments where a home comfort meal makes us feel the world of good. Generally speaking, comforting food comes in the form of something which doesn’t always make you feel that great after consumption though, however with a few changes we can still enjoy these same comforts but with a healthy twist, and subsequently enjoy them guilt free.

CHIPS!

There are different kinds of chip eaters - whether you’re a sharer, an occasional enjoyer, a wrap them up and take them home to enjoy on your own kind of person, or someone who simply can’t get enough of them, a portion of the nation’s favourite shaped potato doesn’t ever go amiss. However, they aren’t always the healthiest option; the humble sweet potato though makes for an entirely different story. One of our absolute favourite home comfort alternatives comes in the form of sweet potato fries, and is a great way also of getting a wonderful amount of beta-carotene, fibre and hair, nail and skin nourishing goodness into your system without any compromise on comfort! Simply slice them, add a small drizzle of olive oil, herbs, and whichever flavourings take your fancy, and pop them in the oven - it really couldn’t be easier!

SPAG BOL

The perfect carby comfort food, try spirallazing your favourite vegetable, we like butternut squash, courgette or carrot and gently cook these in a drizzle of oil until softened. Serve with your favourite veggie packed Bolognese and a generous helping of reduced fat cheese, or a lighter cheese such as feta. Another great option is buckwheat or brown rice pasta, as they are completely gluten free as well as healthful and honestly taste just as good. Try mashing together an avocado, basil, lemon and pine nuts for a healthy creamy alternative too!

PANCAKES

Making for the perfect Sunday brunch option (or just whichever meal takes your fancy), it’s undeniable that these are some of our favourite go-to’s for an indulgent, home comfort-style meal. However, with the general ingredients for our favourite round indulgence being not extremely healthy, and therefore not something we generally indulge in on a daily basis, its important to recognise the ingredients which will make up for this so that we can do just that! Ingredients which are great for this include oats, banana, almond milk, medjool dates and more - all completely natural and make for a delicious, energy abundant treat whenever takes your fancy.

COOKIES

Try a cashew coconut cookies for a wonderfully crunchy snack with a slight Christmassy feel to them with the ginger and cinnamon element to them. As well as this, chocolate-banana oat cookies are a great alternative to our choccy childhood faves, with cacao powder and date syrup creating the flavours we all love and once again, oats and bananas the consistency. They really are great, and you can be rest assured once you smell them exiting the oven, it will be as though you have been transformed back to your childhood home treats once again. So enjoy your tasty summer comfort foods, on us!

Modern Dieting – balance is key!

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13.07.16

Put together by the Guardian, this article perfectly describes the issues of modern day dieting and the 'gospel' words of many un-qualified celebrity like role models which encourage clean eating and missing out crucial food groups from our diets..

It mustn't be forgotten that despite healthy cook books and advice being great for those interested in pursuing a healthier lifestyle and encouraging cooking rather than buying ready meals, to not take this advice so literally as balance is key!

"Every Sunday in the centre of Brixton, a group of Afro-Caribbean women of a certain age, gather on Atlantic Road to sing lustily about Jesus while wearing big hats. As a diehard atheist I am meant to have no time for organised religion. But the fact is they’re not harming anyone and they look very happy indeed.

If only all religions were so benign. If only all religions were so cheerful. But they are not. Recently a new kind of religion has arisen; one engineered for a godless age and specifically designed to make its devotees feel worse about themselves more often than they feel better. Like all religions it is based on hocus-pocus, misdirection and delusion. This new religion is called The Diet.

Yes of course diets have been around for centuries, promoted just as they are now through books. And for the most part they have always been stupid: the grapefruit diet, the red wine and steak diet, the kitten and stilton diet. I may have invented one of those. But generally they were functional. Do thing A and thing B and you will get result C. They didn’t work because like, pyramid investment schemes, they never do.

 madshaw

What the modern diet books have that the previous lot didn’t is a moral dimension. They are not merely instruction manuals. They are secular catechisms. There is an implication in these titles, written by young people with glossy hair and clear eyes who look like they think their farts smell only of peaches and peppermint, that if you don’t follow their plans you will not merely be fat. You will be bad. You will be a flawed person who through, lack of insight and moral fibre, has failed to reach their full potential in the way the authors have.

Well I wonder if I might be permitted to make a learned intervention into this noble discussion of the human soul, by saying this: sod off! Really, go away. Find something else to do. Take up boxing; it may involve hurting people but at least there are rules. In saying this I am only adding my voice to a growing choir. The brilliant Ruby Tandoh recently examined the speciousness of some of the faux-scientific thinking underpinning various of these works. A new blogger called the Angry Chef has been laying waste in superbly forensic style to the flaws in dietary advice and a general failure to understand the science of food and cooking. And Nigella has had a stab at the use of the phrase “Clean Eating”. Food does not have a moral aspect. Only the people eating it do.

But we need to go further and argue against one other element of all this: the use of guilt as if it were a weapon being wielded by a 14th-century pope. I am often asked what my guilty food secret is. I reply that I don’t have one. Because if I started feeling guilty, where would I stop? There are some foods that I like but which I know I shouldn’t eat too much of and that’s what I try to do. Guilt corrodes. Instead I go to the gym and watch what I eat, like any responsible adult. But I also make a point of enjoying what life has to offer. Food is just too much of a pleasure to be sullied by the stupidities of a bunch of swivel-eyed hucksters whose only real credential is the size of their Instagram following. Put that in your nutribullet and drink it."

mindful-eating

That’s A Wrap

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08.07.16

Whether you're on the go or you just like to roll your food these fun, healthy wrap recipes are for you! They are packed full of whole plant foods, our friendly fruits and vital veggies, in other words we love the work of mother nature and so should you! 1.) Southern Black Bean Wraps These colourful wraps are full of goodness and wonder! You can practically see the health through the vibrant phytonutrients pigments of the sweet potato and green leafy vegetables! You can wrap up at least 3 servings of your 5 a day in this recipe alone!   Check out the full recipe here! And for more information on why you should be eating more beans click here! southwestern_veggie_wraps4   2.) Nori Burrito Just about everyone loves sushi and burritos, this sushi burrito recipe makes the best out of both worlds! Also the brown rice in this recipe whams in a punch that has been associated with increased weight loss, lower blood pressure and decreased inflammation! For more information on brown rice click here! Then roll on over here for the full wrap recipe! P.S. This is gluten free sweet-potato-sushi-burrito-1200x750 3.) Protein Packed Hummus Wrap Throw your kale confetti in the air because this wrap is a celebration of health! This humble hummus wrap will have you humming with happiness! For the full recipe click here! protein-power-hummus-wrap     4.) Summer Rainbow Rice Paper Rolls This summer rice paper rolls all about rainbows and sunshine and are sure to leave you with a vibrant glow from head to toe! Check out the full recipe with the secret sauce here! Almost-RAW-Rainbow-Veggie-Spring-Rolls-with-Ginger-Peanut-Sauce-vegan-glutenfree- 5.) Easy Mexican Bean Burrito Would you like to burry your worries with burritos? Well this recipe is for you! Check out the full recipe here!     mexicanburritos5-1-of-11   For more wrap recipes head on over here!

National Vegetarian Week – the best of the bites!

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17.05.16

National Vegetarian Week is upon us, so why not try one of these delicious meat-free meals?

These dishes are full of flavour, texture and colour so you won't feel like you're missing out on anything at all.

For the Pasta and Cheese lovers..

Mac and three cheeses recipe

SERVES 4

INGREDIENTS 1 x 410g tin of evaporated milk 200g cream cheese 2 tsp English mustard ¼ tsp freshly grated nutmeg 350g macaroni 3 tbsp chi coconut oil 1 small garlic clove, crushed 175g  Comté or cheddar, grated 75g stilton, crumbled 500g green beans 1 tbsp chopped chives 45g  sourdough breadcrumbs 45g  pecans 150g sun-dried tomatoes in olive oil

METHOD Preheat the oven to 180°C/350°F/gas mark 4.
Whisk the evaporated milk, cream cheese and mustard well. Add the nutmeg and plenty of freshly ground black pepper.
Bring 3.5 litres of salted water to a boil, and add the macaroni, slowly, making sure the water is always boiling. Stir for a minute to stop the macaroni sticking together. Test after about eight minutes – the macaroni should be very al dente. Drain well and add to the cream-cheese mixture.
 Mix a tablespoon of coconut oil and garlic and use this to grease a deep 20 x 20cm (8 x8 in) baking-dish. Spread half of the macaroni on the bottom of the dish. Scatter on half of the Comté and all of the stilton, cover with another layer of macaroni and finish with the rest of the Comté. Bake for 25 to 30 minutes, or until bubbly and golden.
Boil or steam the green beans until tender with a slight crunch – about five minutes. Drain, place in a bowl and sprinkle with the chives. Heat the coconut oil in a frying-pan. When hot, add the breadcrumbs and pecans and cook for two to three minutes, until crisp and golden. Add the beans and toss to coat them well. Serve the macaroni with green beans and, if you wish, a few tomatoes on the side.   cheesemac

Mushroom, spinach, and blue-cheese lasagne

This creamy vegetarian lasagne full of chesnut mushrooms is perfect served with a big salad and some fresh crusty bread

SERVES 4
INGREDIENTS 3 tbsp olive oil 2 x 250g packs chestnut mushrooms, cleaned and sliced 1 large onion, finely chopped 1 large clove of garlic, crushed 2 x 240g packs pre-washed fresh spinach 1 large jar ready-made white sauce (710g) 12 sheets ready-to-bake lasagne 125g blue cheese, crumbled
METHOD Preheat the oven to 200C/gas mark 6. Heat one tablespoon of olive oil in a large pan, add half the mushrooms and fry until golden, about five minutes. Transfer them to kitchen paper, add another tablespoon of oil to the pan and fry the remaining mushrooms, also transferring them to kitchen paper after five minutes.
Add the final tablespoon of olive oil to the pan and cook the onion and garlic for about four minutes, until soft. Add the spinach to the pan, cover with a lid and allow it to wilt for one to two minutes. Return the mushrooms to the pan, mix together and season.
Use a rectangular dish about 24 x 18cm and spread a layer of white sauce on the base. Place three lasagne sheets on the sauce followed by a third of the mushroom mixture, another layer of white sauce and some crumbled cheese.
Add another three sheets of lasagne and continue layering, finishing with the final three sheets of lasagne, a good covering of white sauce and a sprinkling of crumbled cheese. Bake for 35 to 40 minutes until it is cooked through and the topping is bubbling and golden. Serve with a side salad or garlic bread.

Aubergine, pepper and yogurt stacks with coriander pesto

Serves four
3 red peppers chi coconut oil for brushing 2 large aubergines ½ lemon 8 heaped tbsp Greek yogurt sprigs of coriander to serve
For the pesto: 60g (2oz) coriander leaves 40g (1½oz) blanched almonds, lightly toasted 2 garlic cloves, chopped juice of ½ lemon 125ml (4fl oz) extra-virgin olive oil (not too grassy) 60g (2oz) feta cheese, finely crumbled 1 red chilli, halved, deseeded and finely chopped 1 green chilli, halved, deseeded and finely chopped
Preheat the oven to 190°C/375°F/gas mark 5. Halve the peppers and remove the seeds and stalk. Put into a small roasting-tin and brush with olive oil. Season. Roast for 35 minutes, or until the peppers are tender and the edges of the flesh are slightly scorched.
Meanwhile make the pesto by putting everything, except the feta and chilli, into a food processor. Whizz to a purée. Season to taste, then scrape into a bowl and add the feta cheese and chilli.   stacks_2917851b
Bean chilli with chocolate and walnuts
SERVES 6-8
INGREDIENTS 2 tbsp chi coconut oil 1 large onion, finely chopped 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped 2 tsp cumin seeds or 1 tsp ground cumin 1 fresh chilli, deseeded and finely chopped (more if you like it hot) 1 tsp ground paprika 1 tsp dried oregano 1 red and 1 yellow pepper, seeded and finely chopped 1 carrot, finely chopped 2 sweetcorn cobs (kernels cut off) or 150g thawed frozen sweetcorn 2 large celery sticks (use leaves too), finely sliced 150g  walnuts, very finely chopped 300g dried mixed beans, such as kidney, black-eye or borlotti, soaked and cooked (or 3 x 400g cans cooked mixed pulses, drained) 2 x 400g cans whole plum tomatoes 2 tsp sea salt 60g dark chocolate (minimum 80 per cent cocoa solids), broken into pieces
to serve 120ml  plain yogurt 1 large handful coriander leaves, coarsely chopped Giving Tree broccoli and pumpkin crisps to dip and use as toppings too
METHOD Heat the oil in a large heavy-based saucepan or casserole over a medium heat. Add the onion, garlic, spices and oregano and cook for a couple of minutes, stirring occasionally, until the spices smell fragrant and the onions are soft but not browned.
Add the peppers, carrot, sweetcorn and celery and cook for another couple of minutes. Add the walnuts, beans, tomatoes, 250ml (9fl oz) water and salt, bring to the boil, then reduce the heat and simmer for 20 minutes. Stir in the chocolate and cook for a couple of minutes. Taste and season. Serve in bowls, garnished with a dollop of yogurt and chopped coriander with toasted corn tortillas on the side. Any leftovers can be stored in the fridge for three to five days.

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Why are there days when you just can’t stop eating? Banish the hunger!

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16.05.16

This great article for the Daily Mail features advice from our nutritionist Rhiannon Lambert on why you get those dreaded hunger pangs!

You know the feeling - you wake up with hunger pangs that even a hearty breakfast and slap-up lunch do little to diminish. But what causes those 'hyper-hungry' days when all you can think about is the next snack? We look at the science behind the stomach rumbles.

YOU'RE NOT GETTING ENOUGH SLEEP

If you didn't sleep well last night, chances are you won't only feel exhausted. You will feel ravenous, too.

Those who don't go to bed until the early hours end up eating an extra 248 calories the next day, according to a study in the journal Obesity.

Those who don't go to bed until the early hours end up eating an extra 248 calories the next day

Those who don't go to bed until the early hours end up eating an extra 248 calories the next day

Being exhausted has also been found to encourage us to eat twice the amount of high-calorie fast food and fizzy drinks - and half the amount of fruit and veg.

If you keep skimping on sleep, scientists say you are likely to become badly overweight, because the stress on your body interrupts the balance of 'hunger hormones' ghrelin and leptin, which tell you if you are hungry or full.

As a result, people who regularly get only five hours of sleep have been found to be 50 per cent more likely to be obese than those getting eight hours.

Nutritionist Rhiannon Lambert, of rhitrition.com, says: 'If you are tired and your body hasn't had enough sleep the night before to stoke energy levels, it is going to crave glucose - sugar, carbs and fizzy drinks - like crazy because it needs more energy quickly.'

EATING TOO MANY CARBS AT DINNERTIME

If you felt famished when you woke up this morning, cast your mind back to what you had for dinner last night. If it was pizza, garlic bread and cake, you went to sleep on a major sugar high.

Refined carbohydrates such as these are made of small molecules which are quickly digested and converted into glucose - a sugar produced by the liver that fuels the brain. Eating them causes levels of these sugars not only to rise rapidly but to drop fast, too.

The resulting low means on waking up, your brain immediately craves glucose. Hunger hormones are then released, making you want to eat as soon as possible.

To avoid starting the day hungry, experts advise dinners that combine more complex carbs - brown rice, whole grain breads and pastas, which are processed more slowly by the body - with proteins, such as meat, fish or nuts, which are also more difficult to digest.

Endocrinologist Sir Stephen O'Rahilly, a professor at Cambridge University, says carbs don't switch off hunger hormones as well as other foods.

'Inside your intestines are tiny sensor cells which detect how much protein and carbs you have eaten.

'Protein stimulates these cells more strongly than carbs, which is why it's harder to eat too much steak than too much pizza. You need to include protein in meals to tell your brain you have had enough.'

A BIG NIGHT OUT WITH FRIENDS

Drinking doesn't just land you with a raging hangover the next morning. It can also give you the munchies.

Research published in the journal Alcohol And Alcoholism found just three glasses of wine can lower levels of hormone leptin, which keeps hunger at bay, by up to 30 per cent.

Also, your liver will have spent so much time breaking down the alcohol in your blood overnight it won't have been able to deliver the levels of glucose your brain needs to function.

Professor O'Rahilly, says: 'If you poison your liver with alcohol, it does not make the normal amount that your brain is used to. So when you wake up, it screams emergency because it wants glucose so badly.'

MOUTHWATERING FOOD ADS

Tempting food smells set off cravings, too. Our brains light up when we smell our favourite foods - in the same way that those of cocaine addicts do when they think about their next drug fix

With food adverts tempting us everywhere we go, no wonder eating is always on our minds.

Just looking at pictures of appetising meals can make you hungry, according to researchers at Germany's Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry.

They found we produce more nof the hunger hormone ghrelin when we see the images.

Tempting food smells set off cravings, too. New York-based Brookhaven National Laboratory found our brains light up when we smell our favourite foods - in the same way that those of cocaine addicts do when they think about their next drug fix.

The result of all this is that we no longer just eat when we are hungry, says Alison Clark, of the British Dietetic Association. 'Triggers like food ads can actually make people want to eat - even when they don't need to.'

NOT DRINKING ENOUGH WATER

You think you're peckish - but if you don't take on enough fluids, you may be misinterpreting your thirst as hunger. When we are dehydrated, these messages become confused in the hypothalamus, the part of the brain which regulates appetite hormones, so we reach for a snack when we actually need a drink.

Nutritionist Rhiannon Lambert says: 'Our body is 60 per cent water and all our cells need it. If you're dehydrated, you're going to start getting moody, tired, losing concentration. However, that feeling can get confused in the brain with hunger as it has the same effects.

If you don't drink enough, you may be misinterpreting your thirst as hunge

If you don't drink enough, you may be misinterpreting your thirst as hunge

'People should therefore aim for about two litres a day minimum, even when you don't actually feel thirsty, to avoid this confusion.'

SUFFERING THE 'BUFFET EFFECT'

The trend for importing cuisines from all over the world means we have never enjoyed a wider range of exotic flavours.

But eating lots of different types of food at one meal - known as the 'buffet effect' - can trick us into eating more than we need.

A study in the Journal Of Consumer Research found diners tend to eat 10 per cent more if offered a variety of foods.

When faced with a large choice at one meal, researchers think our eyes con us into underestimating the quantities of each dish. Over a year, this 'optical illusion' can lead to weight gain of up to 20 lb.

Therapist Marisa Peer, author of You Can Be Younger, says studies show how a new taste can also reset our appetite - even when full. 'There is only so much of one food we can have before we get bored and stop eating. When you are given a taste, even if feeling full, it stimulates your appetite again.

'This is why you still have room for dessert after a filling Sunday lunch.'

WOLFING DOWN YOUR MEAL

When you rush a meal, you may fill your stomach quickly. But your brain needs time to register you've had enough.

Experts say it starts to realise you are full only when your meal begins to be digested.

'It takes about 20 minutes for your body to register and for your receptors in your stomach to reach the brain and say: “Thanks very much. I'm full. Stop eating,”' says Alison Clark of the British Dietetic Association.

'So we suggest taking time to pause after a meal instead of going on to the next course in order to allow the chemical signals to reach the brain.'

YOUR PERIOD IS ON THE WAY

If your period is on the way, the biscuit tin will be much harder to resist.

During the second half of your menstrual cycle, levels of the sex hormone progesterone rise as your body gets ready for pregnancy by sending blood to the womb.

As part of this preparation, it also triggers hunger hormones to persuade you to eat more and give your body the reserves to grow a baby.

As your period approaches, levels of the female sex hormone oestrogen also dramatically drop off - and with it levels of the feelgood hormone serotonin.

Lucia Lukanova, founder of The Flow app, which helps women chart their cycles, says: 'Women's food cravings start in the last week before their period when their progesterone and oestrogen levels fall.

'This sudden withdrawal is like taking cigarettes away from a smoker so we crave alternatives, like comfort foods, to make us feel better.'

Portion Control – Are your eyes bigger than your belly?

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26.04.16

It's a common problem for us lovers of food, that it can often be hard to say no to seconds, and when food is infront of you we tend to 'pick' and overindulge when in reality are stomachs are more than full. It takes self-control to put back that extra portion, or stop yourself from reaching for a naughty dessert but modern day society doesn't seem to help us either!

Back in a modern kitchen, you suddenly notice how large everything is – 28cm has become a normal diameter for a dinner plate, which in the 1950s would have been 25cm. Serving on these large plates doesn't mean that we have to serve ourselves bigger portions, but we generally tend to! Brian Wansink is a psychologist (author of Mindless Eating: Why We Eat More Than We Think) who has done numerous experiments to prove what you would hope common sense might already tell us: that oversized tableware makes us consume bigger portions. Take for example, a large ice-cream scoop makes you take more ice-cream; a short glass makes you pour more juice. This is because it doesn't look as much, so we  feel we are consuming roughly the same amount.

What a recommended portion actually looks like

nutrition

It seems that the only people who are immune to big portions are tiny children. Up until the age of three or four, children have an enviable ability to stop eating when they are full. After that age, this self-regulation of hunger is lost, and sometimes never relearned. This is a cross-cultural phenomenon, from London to Beijing. One study from the US found that when three-year olds were served small, medium and larger portions of macaroni cheese, they always ate roughly the same amount. By contrast, five-year-olds ate a lot more when the portion of macaroni cheese was oversized.

In a world where food is ever-present, many of us have become like Alice in Wonderland, controlled by cakes that say Eat Me and bottles that say Drink Me. As the nutritionist Marion Nestle remarked 10 years ago in her book, What to Eat: “It is human nature to eat when presented with food, and to eat more when presented with more food.” The trouble is that we are pushed more food, more often, every day. In 2013, the British Heart Foundation published a report called Portion Distortion on how portion sizes in Britain have changed since 1993. Back then, the average American-style muffin weighed 85g, whereas 20 years later it was not uncommon to find muffins weighing 130g. Ready meals have also ballooned in size, with chicken pies expanding by 49% and the average shepherd’s pie nearly doubling in size since 1993 (from 210g to 400g).

over

Our problem with portions and portion control, is partly this: no one likes the concept of “less”. We are conditioned from childhood onwards to yearn for the overflowing glass and the laden table. An easy way to address this at home is simply to use smaller tableware.

Often at the end of a meal, you may not really be hungry but yearn for something sweet. First of all, ensure you are keeping hydrated and drinking enough water throughout the day too as thirst can often be mistaken for hunger. Once you have finished a meal, enjoy your favourite herbal tea or fruit flavour infused water. If you still are craving that sweet treat, then opt for a healthy version of your favourite indulgent treat such as our Giving Tree snacks which are the same nutrition as fresh and SO tasty. If you fancy that chocolate bar, then allow yourself a few squares instead of the whole block!

1 mile fitness!

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04.04.16

With growing Obesity issues throughout the UK, healthy eating as we all know is key to a healthy inside however, fitness should be incorporated into your daily lifestyle too,  1 mile a day of running / walking, whether it is to work, school, walking the dogs will all help your heart health

While a mile a day won't turn back the clocks and make you as fresh faced as a school child, here are just some of the ways it could change your life…

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1. YOU'LL BE MORE ALERT FOR WORK

A study from the University of Georgia looked at using exercise as a treatment for fatigue. They tested three groups, one with low intensity work, one with moderate and one with none.

Both of the exercise groups had a 20% increase in energy levels by the end of the study.

2. YOU'LL BURN CALORIES

While the exact number is variable based on weight, heart-rate and speed, most experts agree that on average people burn about 100 calories running for a mile.

Whether that contributes to a weight loss plan or allows you to eat a little more peanut butter in the morning - it's always good to have a calorie deficit to play with!

3. YOU'LL BE CALMER AND HAPPIER

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) recommends that people with mild to moderate depression take part in about three sessions of exercise a week.

While you may be fortunate enough to not suffer from depression, the positive effects are nothing to be scoffed at

Last year researchers found that the 'running high' activates the same part of the brain as marijuana!

4. YOU'LL IMPROVE YOUR FITNESS

Unsurprisingly, if you run a mile every day your fitness levels will go up. While you would have to up your millage if you were planning on running a marathon, simply being active every day will make a huge difference to your endurance and ability to process oxygen.

5. YOU'LL BE PART OF A COMMUNITY

The running community is huge and even if you don't want to join a club - although there are great ones available - you can join the select few people putting in the work to maintain a #runstreak.

With a recent survey of British women finding that sports and the gym were their top hobby (88% of respondents) it's clear that this is a simple change that a lot of us could embrace!

Don't forget to refuel with a post workout snack of  Giving Tree crisps!

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Giving Tree Easter Recipes

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23.03.16

Easter is round the corner and we are here to bring you the healthiest and tastiest easter recipes to crowd please and of course, they can be enjoyed any time of the year too!

Here are our favourites..

Recipe courtesy of the lovely Rhiannon Lambert - our lovely nutritionist (www.rhitrition.com)

1. To wake you up with a chocolatey Easter twist.. This delicious bowl of Chocolate Proats goodness that's super indulgent yet absolutely guilt free!

1. Grain Free / Paleo Goey Chocolate Brownies with Giving Tree Strawberries (recipe courtesy of @londonpaleogirl / www.londonpaleogirl.com (makes 6 brownies)

  • 1 Large Cooked & Mashed Sweet Potato
  • l 1 Egg 
  • 3 large TBS of @adunaworld Super - Cocoa Powder
  •  2 TSP @pipandnut Almond Butter
  • 2 TSP Honey
  •  1/4 Teaspoon Baking Soda 
  • Mix together until a smooth consistency & pour onto baking paper in a baking tray & put in a 200• pre heated oven for 15 minutes / until cooked •• To make Chocolate Icing mix @chocshot sauce with a TSP @pipandnut Almond Butter l 2 Table spoons Honey l 2 TSP @adunaworld Super - Cocoa Powder ••
  • Served with Coconut Yogurt l Cinnamon l drizzle of @chocshot sauce & a frozen Raspberry on top

paleobrownie

2. The perfect evening meal to be shared with family and friends!

Courgetti Meatballs with a sprinkling of Giving Tree Broccoli crisps - recipe courtesy of the lovely Rhiannon Lambert - our lovely nutritionist (www.rhitrition.com)

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St Patrick’s Day Fun in…London!

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15.03.16

It’s all about the Emerald Isle this week. So here's our guide to the best 'craic'.

The official Parade was on Sunday 13th March in Trafalgar Square, with plenty of people and plenty of dancing!

However, come Thursday March 17, there will be LOTS of people dressed in green, and there will be plenty of celebrating including drinking, dancing and eating all around London too

St Patrick's Day Parade, London 2010

The dancing

Want to get your own feet moving? St Patrick's Day at Mr Fogg's Tavern Head down to the mystical world of Mr Fogg's Tavern on Thurs March 17th as his Irish cousin, Seamus Fogg, is in town and he's throwing a good old-fashioned hooley. Seamus will be bringing his favourite Irish band along to the party and an Irish stew and specially crafted whisky cocktails will be on the menu to celebrate St Paddy's Day.

Folk Of The Wood: St Patrick's Ceilidh Celebrate St Patrick's Day with this traditional dance featuring guest Irish dancers from the Mulvihill Academy. There will be plenty of Guinness at the bar and an Irish stew bubbling away.

Portico Gallery , West Norwood Friday March 18 2016

The eating

The Elmore Jam A father and daughter team present this supperclub which offers live musical accompaniment from a three-piece jazz band. Each event is themed around a different cuisine according to which chef is doing the cooking. Irish chef Úna Donohoe wil be providing a four course meal using Irish ingredients for a St. Patrick's Day special edition on March 17. She will be joined by traditional Irish band Beannacht Lá Fhéile Pádraig.

Secret London location , London Thursday March 17 2016

The Porterhouse, Covent Garden 21-22 Maiden Ln, WC2E 7NA

This vast place, split over 12 levels, has the gold medal from Brewing Industry International Awards (basically the Olympics of brewing). Its stout is truly Irish: handcrafted in Dublin and then shipped to us in London. Great Irish food and, in the basement, live rock music.

Not to mention our Giving Tree Broccoli Crisps! The perfect green snack to be munching on St Paddy's Day!

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The drinking

It wouldn’t be St Paddy’s Day without a pint of the black stuff, and no London pub is more devoted to it than Soho’s Toucan. Vintage posters cover the walls, and you can even order a Guinness cocktail.  If you’d rather drink something less obvious than Guinness or Irish whiskey, try attending Last Libations at B&H Buildings, a tasting masterclass which on March 17 will include poitín. The Irish moonshine was so potent that it was banned for three centuries and only legalised in 1997. Time to get reacquainted.

And the leprechauns!

You can build your very own lucky mascot at Drink, Shop & Do’s papier-mâché leprechaun workshop on March 17. The crafty fun is free when you buy a drink. Bring some friends along so you’ll have company on the post-cocktail hunt for that blessed pot of gold

 st pads ft im